Trans*

Nominations for the 2015 United States Trans 100 List – Now Open

Nominations

This form is used to to collect nominees for the 2015 United States Trans 100 List. Past lists are available on The Trans 100 website at http://thetrans100.com/download/. For more information on the nomination and selection process, visit http://thetrans100.com/about/.

Nominations are open until Friday, January 16, 2015.

The key question to ask is this: What is this nominee doing to make life better for the trans community?

All nominees must:

– Self-identify as trans.
– Be actively working to improve the lives of trans people.
– Live in the United States.
– Not have previously appeared on The Trans 100.

We particularly encourage the nomination of individuals who:
– Are doing work that is unsung and/or unseen.
– Are working in areas of multiple intersections of power and privilege.
– Live outside of major population centers (New York, Los Angeles, etc).

The Trans 100 places special consideration on those working in the areas of ostracism elimination, stigma reduction, poverty reduction, furthering the social and economic development of the trans community, and building infrastructure within the trans community.

Nominees can be working at any scale, locally, regionally, or nationally.
Additional Notes:- Voting is anonymous.- The list will not be ranked, and the tally will not be publicized.- Nominees will be contacted by the editors for permission before the list is published.

If you have any questions or concerns about this form or the nomination process please email 2015 Trans 100 Co-Director Rebecca Kling at rebecca@rebeccakling.com

Thank you for participating, and please share this widely!

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Bigotry, Childhood, Discrimination, Domestic Violence, Emotions, Equality, Family, Gender, Gender Expression, Gender Identity, Hate, Kira, LGBT, Life, MtF, Pain, Personal, Short Film, Thoughts, Trans*, Transgender, Transphobia, Transsexual, Understanding, Work In Progress

“Acceptance” a Short film on Transgender Discrimination & Hate Crimes

**Trigger Warning**

(Violence, Bullying, Discrimination)

 

What is depicted in the film is fairly benign, yet I know even small things can be a trigger.

 

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So Far

I had set out to write an epic post covering the past two weeks when, halfway through I realized sharing every little detail wasn’t as important as writing about what I learned.

It’s all too easy to get caught up in the “how” and loose sight of the “why.” Which is why taking a step away has proven to be a good thing, and I suppose is yet another lesson I have learned for the week.

The most important things I have learned so far:

It doesn’t pay to be lazy or to take the easy road. Some things are worth the effort.

I am NOT a weekend only girl. Why I thought I could live with being comfortable with myself only two days a week, (or less), is simply beyond me. Regardless of any other consideration, I am me 24/7 and trying to hide this truth, even when it is convenient, isn’t worth the issues it causes. So from now on I spend sometime for myself each day.

I can only take responsibility for my own thoughts and feelings. It is NOT my place or right to take responsibility or anyone else. In truth it is rather disrespectful.

And last, but most importantly… I have an incredible person in my life who is not only my partner, she is also my best friend and I am blessed beyond words to have her beside me each day.

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In The News

Transgender, Schlumpy and Human

THERE’S a scene in the new Amazon show “Transparent” when the family patriarch, Mort, walks in on his oldest daughter in flagrante with her lesbian lover. The character, who’s been struggling throughout the pilot with how to come out as trans, stands there in drag with a bemused expression. “Hello, ladies,” Mort — now Maura — says.

Source: New York Times

 

‘Argentina’s Gender Identity Law is the best in the world’

Forty-nine-year-old Marcela Romero — an activist, a transsexual woman, and a mother — has lived a life that most people could hardly imagine. Born in Chaco province in the country’s northeast, she came to Buenos Aires at the age of 14 but was met with the heavy hand of the military dictatorship, which detained her several times in an institution for minors. At 22 she underwent gender affirmation surgery, later becoming the proud adopted mother of her late partner’s son.

Source: Buenos Aires Herald

 

Seven questions about transgender issues you were afraid to ask

A flap erupted between writer and trans activist Janet Mock and CNN host Piers Morgan last week after Mock appeared on Morgan’s show to promote her memoir, “Redefining Realness.” Morgan repeatedly asserted that Mock had been “born a boy” or that she “used to be a man.” After her appearance, Mock expressed her disappointment on Twitter.

Source: The Washington Post

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News Stories Online

Facebook adds FIFTY new options for users to describe their gender

Facebook has completely revamped its gender settings to allow for options other than just male or female.

The feature is designed to help transgender users of the site, and now has 50 options, including  ‘cisgender,’ ‘transgender’ and ‘intersex’.

The site has also updated its setting to allow users to select a neutral pronoun referring to them as they, their or them.

Source: The Daily Mail

 

Transgender Issues Follow Path Blazed By Gay Rights

It may have been “the gayest year ever,” as some gay and lesbian activists put it — 2013 saw the Defense of Marriage Act struck down by the Supreme Court and the number of states offering marriage rights to same-sex couples doubled, to a total of 18.
But as 2014 begins, another issue is gaining traction: transgender rights.

Source: Yahoo News

 

Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk From Hormone Therapy

Exercise may moderately shave off some of the increased risk of hormone therapy, researchers found.

Source: MedPage Today 

 

Lee, Cruz seek to protect states’ rights on gay marriage

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex., has introduced a measure that would protect states like Utah that want to define marriage as between one woman and one man from any federal efforts to recognize gay marriage.

Source: The Salt Lake Tribune

 

Comcast, Time Warner agree to merge in $45 billion deal

Comcast said Thursday it has agreed to buy Time Warner Cable for $45.2 billion in stock, a deal that would combine the two largest cable providers in the country.

Source: Washington Post

 

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In Response

For some reason WordPress isn’t allowing me to access my Notifications through any of my browsers, (Chrome, Safari). I can still answer short comments via my phone but detail responses are difficult.

So, because I felt it was important to respond to one comment in particular, I am doing so here instead, I hope Robin doesn’t mind.

Let me copy her comment here and then I will respond below.

“I found that while I had to wait, going to a gender therapist to confirm what I knew in my heart was very affirming and helped a little. Daily application of moisturizer and shaving almost all of my body hair helped, too. Sometimes, since I had to work in “boy mode”, wearing something feminine underneath (bra, panties, maybe a chemise) helped… all stuff that no one noticed (despite my fear it would be glaringly obvious).

I also recommend you start shopping for wardrobe *now*. Shoes, coats, gloves, scarves, hats, skirts, blouses… all of it. You will need an obscene amount of clothing when you do go full time… and buying pretty things (even if you’re on a thrift store budget like I am) can help.

Also, remember you are on a process… it won’t happen overnight, but little by little you will get there. *hug*”

 

Robin,

I am currently in therapy, though not with a GS. Unfortunately the nearest ones are in Chicago which is a three hour drive.Still my therapist, Jodi, has been a tremendous help for me in working through many issues and I am thankful to her for her support.

As for my “stealth” presentation… Mostly this is an issue when it comes to work. I am not conformable with the idea of coming out to my employer or coworkers and I have to admit I might never be. So I will continue to present as male there for the foreseeable future, though I admit this might have to change at some point.

Because of this, I do some similar things to yourself; using moisturizer, body shaving, using Secret instead of men’s Speed Stick, I have also let my hair and nails grow out, wear a pony tail and clear nail strengthener in place of polish. All of these things do help, though it often the use of my birth name and male pronouns which cause the most problems.

On the issue of dressing; for work I have found there is little difference between what I use to wear and what I do now. In fact, no one has really noticed the slight changes I have made which are more about being comfortable rather than obviously feminine. T-shirts, sweat shirts, jeans. All of this is pretty gender neutral outside of sizes and fabrics and who looks so close anyway?

Away from work is a different story and here I have to say my dysphoria is more about my internal dialogue than it is about other’s reactions.

I have breast “enhancers”, silicone shapers, which give me the correct shape. I wear pretty much women’s clothing exclusively although I do often wear those same T-shirts, sweat shirts, and jeans as I do to work depending on my mood and how lazy I feel. 

 I really do have a decent wardrobe at this point, tops, pants, black and blue jeans, mock necks, turtle necks, sweaters, cardigans, pullovers, some button up blouses, three quarter and full sleeves. I happen to have some tattoos). I also have a decent collection of shoes and boots including flats and heels, sneakers and even a pair of furry house boots.

I also have acquired some jewelry, a necklace, a bracelet, and ring which I often wear regardless of how I want people to see me.

In addition I also have a Winter coat and a leather jacket for Spring and Fall. I have several scarves, though I want to get more and two purses, one with matching wallet.

I also have two wigs, though how often and where I wear them is a point of contention with my partner. If you look through my posts or “About” page you can see me with them on.

99% of my shopping is through thrift store, consignment shops, and garage sales. As I like to say, I have champaign taste on a beer pocketbook!

If I buy anything new it is only when there is a great sale.

Now, as I mentioned earlier, much of my current problems are internal. It is the way I project my fears and expectations onto those around me and not the way I have been spoken to or treated. In fact, as time passes I find I am greeted with female pronouns and generally treated as a woman more often than not. Those time when I am not, it is because I have had to use my birth name or am presenting androgynously enough the other person isn’t sure how to address me.

The fact I am so often aware of those things which I feel mark me as “different” is more on me than anyone, after all, I am the most aware of those things being an issue, most people don’t even notice. This is true of my voice which is a major sticking point to me. I have been told time and again it is more than passing, yet to me it is completely wrong… I don’t know what I think it should be, but it isn’t what I hear. 

As for the other part… well, there are ways of reducing how noticeable such things are and I am looking into those. Thankfully they aren’t overly expensive as such things go and I plan to have something before Summer arrives.

 

Let me add something here… In the end it doesn’t matter what I do, what procedures I have done, what training I engage in; there is only so far I can go in transition.

There will be a point beyond which I cannot pass, after all, my past is what it is and cannot be changed. Also there is basic biological differences between what I can achieve and what I would have been born with… bone structure, nerve endings, skin texture, hair texture… there is quite a list of what will always set me apart from my sisters. The thing is, only I can come to terms with such things. Only I can become fully comfortable in my own skin. There is no magic pill for it. I have to do it for myself and this is what I am struggling with at the moment. 

Yet you know something?

Right now, with all of the ups and downs, doubts and fears… I feel more complete and at peace with myself than I have err felt in my life.

I can look in the mirror, see who is there and smile because, makeup or no, hair or no, half asleep or wide awake, it is me there and she is a beautiful person.

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Definition of Terms: Sex, Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation

Excerpt from: The Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients, adopted by the APA Council of Representatives, February 18-20, 2011. The Guidelines are available on the APA website at http://www.apa.org/pi/lgbt/resources/guidelines.aspx

Definition of Terms

Sex refers to a person’s biological status and is typically categorized as male, female, or intersex (i.e., atypical combinations of features that usually distinguish male from female). There are a number of indicators of biological sex, including sex chromosomes, gonads, internal reproductive organs, and external genitalia.

Gender refers to the attitudes, feelings, and behaviors that a given culture associates with a person’s biological sex. Behavior that is compatible with cultural expectations is referred to as gender-normative; behaviors that are viewed as incompatible with these expectations constitute gender non-conformity.

Gender identity refers to “one’s sense of oneself as male, female, or transgender” (American Psychological Association, 2006). When one’s gender identity and biological sex are not congruent, the individual may identify as transsexual or as another transgender category (cf. Gainor, 2000).

Gender expression refers to the “…way in which a person acts to communicate gender within a given culture; for example, in terms of clothing, communication patterns and interests. A person’s gender expression may or may not be consistent with socially prescribed gender roles, and may or may not reflect his or her gender identity” (American Psychological Association, 2008, p. 28).

Sexual orientation refers to the sex of those to whom one is sexually and romantically attracted. Categories of sexual orientation typically have included attraction to members of one’s own sex (gay men or lesbians), attraction to members of the other sex (heterosexuals), and attraction to members of both sexes (bisexuals). While these categories continue to be widely used, research has suggested that sexual orientation does not always appear in such definable categories and instead occurs on a continuum (e.g., Kinsey, Pomeroy, Martin, & Gebhard, 1953; Klein, 1993; Klein, Sepekoff, & Wolff, 1985; Shiveley & DeCecco, 1977) In addition, some research indicates that sexual orientation is fluid for some people; this may be especially true for women (e.g., Diamond, 2007; Golden, 1987; Peplau & Garnets, 2000).

Coming out refers to the process in which one acknowledges and accepts one’s own sexual orientation. It also encompasses the process in which one discloses one’s sexual orientation to others. The term closeted refers to a state of secrecy or cautious privacy regarding one’s sexual orientation.

*The 2011 guidelines replace the Guidelines for Psychotherapy with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients adopted by the Council, February 26, 2000, which expired at the end of 2010. 

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