Republicans want to let unsupportive parents sue doctors who treat their transgender children

The bill follows a Republican blatantly untrue narrative that children are being forced to transition against their will.

Republicans want to let unsupportive parents sue doctors who treat their transgender children

A group of Republican senators has introduced a bill that would deny federal funds to any gender-affirming medical care for transgender individuals. The bill would also allow anyone who received such care (and their parents) to sue the medical professionals who provided it. But the bill is based on a misleading and transphobic view of how gender-affirming care actually works.

The so-called “Protect Minors from Medical Malpractice Act of 2022” would give individuals who were given puberty blockers, hormone replacement therapy, and surgical procedures — and their parents — up to 30 years after the age of 18 to sue the medical professionals who administered the care.

The bill would also make it so that neither federal dollars nor federal laws could compel medical practitioners to offer such care.

Far right groups shift focus to LBGTQ events. Their hateful aim hasn’t changed

Far right groups shift focus to LBGTQ events. Their hateful aim hasn’t changed

Two incidents in which far-right extremists targeted LGBTQ events earlier this month marked what appeared to be a shift in focus for white supremacist activists.

A group of men with ties to the white nationalist Patriot Front was arrested outside a Pride event in Coeur D’Alene, Idaho. The same day, alleged members of the far-right Proud Boys crashed a children’s drag queen storytelling event and shouted homophobic and transphobic slurs, in what Alameda, Calif., sheriffs are now investigating as a possible hate crime.

Earlier iterations of Patriot Front and the Proud Boys were among the neo-Nazi factions who sought to intimidate the Charlottesville, Va., community at the “Unite the Right” rally in 2017.

Transgender people of color face unique challenges as gender discrimination and racism intersect

Transgender people of color face unique challenges as gender discrimination and racism intersect

Throughout history, transgender people of color have had a place of honor in many indigenous cultures around the world.

This changed in many places, however, as European colonizers began forcing indigenous people to follow white social norms. These include anti-Blackness, Christianity and a gender binary that reduced gender to just man and woman. Colonizers presumed that being cisgender, or having a gender identity that is congruent with gender assigned at birth, was the only acceptable norm.

For trans people who refused or were unable to conform, colonial societies often used racism and cissexism, or behaviors and beliefs that assume the inferiority of trans people, to invalidate their existence, limit their access to resources and threaten their well-being. For example, colonizers in some cases deemed people who expressed their gender outside the binary as sinful and deviant, and punished them with emotional and physical violence.

The reverberations of these colonial beliefs are still felt today. In just the first three months of 2022, there were over 154 anti-trans state bills proposed across the U.S. seeking to limit the rights of trans kids and their parents.

Understanding TERF’s: Their history, thought and “activism”

Understanding TERF’s: Their history, thought and “activism”

Since transgender individuals began to organize and fight for our rights and for more dignified living conditions, we have been facing many obstacles. from certain sectors of the medical community to religious fundamentalists and politically conservative organizations, many are the groups that have been mobilizing with the objective of denying the validity of trans identities and stopping us from obtaining access to essential services such as adequate medical treatment as well as attacking our rights.

‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill signed by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis

‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill signed by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill into law on Monday that forbids instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity in kindergarten through third grade, a policy that has drawn intense national scrutiny from critics who argue it marginalizes LGBTQ people.

The legislation has pushed Florida and DeSantis, an ascending Republican and potential 2024 presidential candidate, to the forefront of the country’s culture wars. LGBTQ advocates, students, Democrats, the entertainment industry and the White House have dubbed the measure the “Don’t Say Gay” law.

DeSantis and other Republicans have repeatedly said the measure is reasonable and that parents, not teachers, should be broaching subjects of sexual orientation and gender identity with their children. The law went into effect just days after DeSantis signed a separate bill that potentially restricts what books elementary schools can keep in their libraries or use for instruction.

03/09/22

There is so much craziness going on in this country, (U.S.) right now I’m almost tempted to turn off the internet all together, (though I won’t because I refuse to crawl into a hole and disappear).

Everywhere you look, there is some conservative, republican, white, cis person spouting hatred and pure misinformation about LGBTQ+ people. The reasons really don’t matter anymore, power, money, or just plain spite, the outcome is the same.

Anti-Trans Violence and Rhetoric Reached Record Highs Across America in 2021

Anti-Trans Violence and Rhetoric Reached Record Highs Across America in 2021

2021 was the deadliest year for transgender and gender non-conforming people in the U.S. on record. At least 50 trans and gender non-conforming people were killed this year alone, per a report by LGBTQ advocacy organization the Human Rights Campaign (HRC)—the highest number of deaths since the organization began recording fatal violence in 2013.

The report makes clear that the full number of fatalities is likely much higher still; the deaths of trans and gender non-conforming people are often underreported, and the victims themselves are often misgendered. (At least 24 of those listed in HRC’s report were initially misgendered by the media or police.)