Why Trans Women Feel Torn in the Wake of the Latest Pose Episode

Why Trans Women Feel Torn in the Wake of the Latest Pose Episode

The world met Pose’s Candy Ferocity on June 3, 2018. The member of the House of Abundance was a speedy, driven, and fast-acting woman with a sharp tongue and tons of energy and motivation to boot.

For the very first time, a generation of young black and brown trans girls saw a new kind of role model on television: Angelica Ross, who portrayed Candy on the FX series, is 38 years old, a self-taught coder who has founded her own non-profit TransTech Social Enterprises, and is independent and empowering.

Ross’s portrayal of Candy — as with the other trans women who play characters on Pose — was strong, flawed, empathetic, raw, funny, and so much more. Pose is one of the first of its kind on TV, boasting the largest trans cast in the medium’s history.

How Trans Actors Are Rewriting the Rules of TV Casting

How Trans Actors Are Rewriting the Rules of TV Casting

Although Jen Richards is transgender, the character she played in the NBC series “Blindspot” was not — at least not on the page.

Richards was approached last year by the showrunner Martin Gero to play, she said, an “aggressive, duplicitous C.I.A. agent,” in a two-episode arc that aired in January. “He saw something in me and liked me,” she recalled, adding that she wasn’t asked to audition for the part.

She had recently picked up Gotham and Peabody Awards for “Her Story,” a web series she starred in and helped write about a pair of trans best friends juggling their personal and professional lives. The six-episode drama was hailed as a landmark moment for L.G.B.T.Q. representation — a rare chance to see trans lives depicted honestly and authentically.

11 Transgender Americans Share Their Stories In HBO’s ‘The Trans List’ : NPR

11 Transgender Americans Share Their Stories In HBO’s ‘The Trans List’ : NPR:

“Eleven Americans describe what it’s like to be transgender in Timothy Greenfield-Sanders’ new HBO documentary, The Trans List. Though the individuals in the film come from varied backgrounds, there is at least one common thread to their experiences: ‘We all come out publicly,’ lawyer Kylar Broadus tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross. ‘There is no hidden way to come out as a trans person.'”

These Rare Photographs Reveal The True Story Behind The Family From Little House On The Prairie

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 These Rare Photographs Reveal The True Story Behind The Family From Little House On The Prairie:

“There can’t be many people in the United States who don’t recognize the jaunty theme tune to Little House on the Prairie. After all, millions of viewers have tuned in to watch its charming depiction of rural Minnesotan life through nine seasons and countless reruns. But just how many people know the true story behind one of America’s favorite television shows?”

(Via. scribol.com)

5 Ways the Web Series Her Story Totally Changes the Conversation | SheWired

5 Ways the Web Series Her Story Totally Changes the Conversation | SheWired:

“Her Story packs a whole lot of important conversations into a wildly entertaining show. Her Story, a new web series written by, directed by, and starring trans women, premiered online last week. In just six episodes under ten minutes, the show tackled everything from transphobia in cisgender lesbian spaces, to the right to choose when and how one discloses that they’re transgender. The show offers a complex exploration of two transgender women characters and their coworkers, friends, and partners, and totally changes the conversation presented by the vast majority of media about trans women. Here are 5 important moments from this must-see show:”

REPORT: How National Media Outlets Cover Transgender News Stories | Research | Media Matters for America

REPORT: How National Media Outlets Cover Transgender News Stories | Research | Media Matters for America:

“Cable, broadcast, and Spanish language news networks largely ignored an ‘epidemic of deadly violence’ against the transgender community in the first two months of 2015, despite devoting coverage to various transgender stories. When networks discussed transgender issues, they often failed to include the voices of transgender individuals, especially transgender women of color.”

(Via. MediaMatters)